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  • 2 - What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?

2 - What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge?

1. What do I typically do to identify critical information?

Teacher Evidence

The teacher identifies a lesson or part of a lesson as involving important information to which students should pay particular attention.

Teacher begins the lesson by explaining why upcoming content is important

Teacher tells students to get ready for some important information

Teacher cues the importance of upcoming information in some indirect fashion

• Tone of voice

• Body position

• Level of excitement

Student Evidence

When asked, students can describe the level of importance of the information addressed in class

When asked, students can explain why the content is important to pay attention to

Students visibly adjust their level of engagement

2. What do I typically do to organize students to interact with new knowledge?

Teacher Evidence

The teacher organizes students into small groups to facilitate the processing of new information.

Teacher has established routines for student grouping and student interaction in groups

Teacher organizes students into ad hoc groups for the lesson

• Dyads

• Triads

• Small groups up to about 5

Student Evidence

Students move to groups in an orderly fashion

Students appear to understand expectations about appropriate behavior in groups

• Respect opinions of others

• Add their perspective to discussions

• Ask and answer questions

3. What do I typically do to preview new content?

Teacher Evidence

The teacher engages students in activities that help them link what they already know to the new content about to be addressed and facilitates these linkages.

Teacher uses preview question before reading

Teacher uses K-W-L strategy or variation of it

Teacher asks or reminds students what they already know about the topic

Teacher provides an advance organizer

• Outline

• Graphic organizer

Teacher has students brainstorm

Teacher uses anticipation guide

Teacher uses motivational hook/launching activity

• Anecdotes

• Short selection from video

Teacher uses word splash activity to connect vocabulary to upcoming content

When necessary, the teacher reteaches basic information or skills

Student Evidence

When asked, student can explain linkages with prior knowledge

When asked, students make predictions about upcoming content

When asked, students can provide a purpose for what they are about to learn

Students actively engage in previewing activities

4. What do I typically do to chunk content into “digestible bites”?

Teacher Evidence

Based on student needs, the teacher breaks the content into small chunks (i.e., digestible bites) of information that can be easily processed by students.

Teacher stops at strategic points in a verbal presentation

While playing a video tape, the teacher turns the tape off at key junctures

While providing a demonstration, the teacher stops at strategic points

While students are reading information or stories orally as a class, the teacher stops at strategic points

Student Evidence

When asked, students can explain why the teacher is stopping at various points

Students appear to know what is expected of them when the teacher stops at strategic points

  

5. What do I typically do to help students process new information?

Teacher Evidence

During breaks in the presentation of content, the teacher engages students in actively processing new information.

Teacher has group members summarize new information

Teacher employs formal group processing strategies

• Jigsaw

• Reciprocal Teaching

• Concept attainment

Student Evidence

When asked, students can explain what they have just learned

Students volunteer predictions

Students voluntarily ask clarification questions

Groups are actively discussing the content

Group members ask each other and answer questions about the information

• Group members make predictions about what they expect next

6. What do I typically do to help students elaborate on new information?  

Teacher Evidence

The teacher asks questions or engages students in activities that require elaborative inferences that go beyond what was explicitly taught.

Teacher asks explicit questions that require students to make elaborative inferences about the content

Teacher asks students to explain and defend their inferences

Teacher presents situations or problems that require inferences

Student Evidence

Students volunteer answers to inferential questions

Students provide explanations and “proofs” for inferences

 

7. What do I typically do to help students record and represent knowledge?

Teacher Evidence

The teacher engages students in activities that help them record their understanding of new content in linguistic ways and/or represent the content in nonlinguistic ways.

Teacher asks students to summarize the information they have learned

Teacher asks students to generate notes that identify critical information in the content

Teacher asks students to create nonlinguistic representations for new content

• Graphic organizers

• Pictures

• Pictographs

• Flow charts

Teacher asks students to create mnemonics that organize the content

Student Evidence

Students’ summaries and notes include critical content

Students’ nonlinguistic representations include critical content

When asked, students can explain main points of the lesson

8. What do I typically do to help students reflect on their learning?

Teacher Evidence

The teacher engages students in activities that help them reflect on their learning and the learning process.

Teacher asks students to state or record what they are clear about and what they are confused about

Teacher asks students to state or record how hard they tried

Teacher asks students to state or record what they might have done to enhance their learning

Student Evidence

When asked, students can explain what they are clear about and what they are confused about

When asked, students can describe how hard they tried

When asked, students can explain what they could have done to enhance their learning